Announcing the 2018 Sabbatical Beauty Scholarship Winners!


We are thrilled to announce our 2018 Sabbatical Beauty Scholarship winners: Chicana Motherwork, Darci Doll & Kel Hughes! Stay tuned to hear more about the results of their research.

Every SB Scholarship finalist also won a $100 gift card to Sabbatical Beauty, to show them how much we admire their research.

Congrats everyone!

Chicana Motherwork

Chicana Motherwork has won a $1000 award and a $100 Sabbatical Beauty gift card for their groundbreaking book, The Chicana M(Other)work Anthology: Porque Sin Madres No Hay Revolución

Chicana Motherwork is a scholarly collective made up by Cecilia Caballero, Yvette Martinez-Vu, Judith Perez-Torres, Michelle Tellez, and Christine Vega. They are applying to fund the indexing costs and revising the introduction to their book. This anthology brings together emerging scholarship and testimonios written and created by self-identified Chicana and Women of Color mother-scholars and allies who center mothering as transformative labor through an intersectional lens. Read more about their project here.

Darci Doll

Darci Doll has won a $1000 award (and a $100 Sabbatical Beauty scholarship) for her research project, Beauty Inaction/Beauty In Action. In her project Darci argues that some companies like Sabbatical Beauty are actively and intentionally using their power to fight against the harmful practices typically associated with the beauty industry.  

Through a series of blogs and videos, she will demonstrate the profitability in positive political socially conscious action and will confirm consumer demand for transparency in how their money is invested in the way the world is shaped. These resources will be shared with the Sabbatical Beauty community to educate, support, and celebrate those embracing this trend. Find out more about Darci's project here.

Kel Hughes

Kel Hughes has won a $300 award (and a $100 Sabbatical Beauty scholarship) for her research project, Black Narcissus: The Role of the Suburban Othermother. She argues that many Black female teachers who have been teaching a number of years are part of a phenomenon called “othermothering,” in which they care for children that are not blood relatives in a lovingly firm way. Through qualitative methods, her study examines the role of Black female teachers identified as “othermothers” in suburban settings with three questions -- what is the experience of the suburban othermother; what is her essence; how does she see herself and her responsibility to her community?  

By the end of August, she aims to have completed her initial interviews, shadowing and focus groups of the subjects in her case study. Read more about Kel's work here.



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